• Polish prosecutors discontinued an investigation into human skeletons found at Wolf’s Lair, a site where Hitler and other Nazis spent time.
  • The remains were discovered by a local historical group at the compound, which now serves as a tourist attraction.
  • Forensic experts examined the remains, which were determined to be from at least four people.

Polish prosecutors have discontinued an investigation into human skeletons found at a site where German dictator Adolf Hitler and other Nazi leaders spent time during World War II because the advanced state of decay made it impossible to determine the cause of death, a spokesman said Monday.

The remains were found Feb. 24 at Wolf’s Lair, which served as Hitler’s chief headquarters from 1941-44 when the area was part of Germany. The compound of about 200 Nazi bunkers and military barracks hidden in deep woods was the site of the failed assassination attempt on Hitler by Col. Claus Stauffenberg on July 20, 1944. The site is now a tourist attraction.

The spokesman for the prosecutor’s office in nearby Ketrzyn town, Daniel Brodowski, said police officers secured the remains after they were found by a local group, Latebra, which searches for historical objects.

HITLER’S VEGETABLE GARDEN DISCOVERED AT HIS SECRET HEADQUARTERS

A forensic medical expert examined them under the supervision of the prosecutor’s office, which was trying to determine if manslaughter had occurred. It discontinued the investigation in late March due to a lack of evidence that a crime had been committed, Brodowski told The Associated Press in an emailed statement.

Wolf's Lair

Visitors walk by a destroyed bunker which is part of the historical Wolf’s Lair, Hitler’s first military headquarters on the Eastern front. Polish prosecutors have discontinued an investigation into human skeletons found at a site where German dictator Adolf Hitler and other Nazi leaders spent time during World War II because the advanced state of decay made it impossible to determine the cause of death, a spokesman said on Monday. (Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

“The expert stated that the preserved bone remains were of human origin and came from at least four people, three of whom were most likely middle-aged men, and the fourth was a child several years of age whose sex cannot be determined,” Brodowski wrote.

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But due to advanced decay of the remains, it was no longer possible to determine the cause of death, he said, noting that at least several dozen years had passed.

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